Community and Economic Development

Subjects of Scale / Spaces of Possibility: Producing Co-operative Space in Theory and Enterprise

Author(s): 
Janelle Terese Cornwell
Year: 
2011
This dissertation addresses key questions raised in Human Geography and Economic Geography concerning scale and the production of space, alternative economic geographies and co-operative economic development. It is the product of a five year ethnographic investigation with cooperative enterprises in Western Massachusetts and the broader Connecticut River Valley of Western New England.

Building a Platform for Economic Democracy: A Cooperative Development Strategy for the Bronx

Author(s): 
Nicholas Iuviene
Year: 
2013
Cooperative development efforts over the last 25 years have been largely inspired by, and modeled on, the Mondragon experience in the Basque region of Spain. None of these efforts has achieved nearly the success of Mondragon, which stabilized and dramatically developed a regional economy through the creation and growth of a diverse set of industrial worker and supportive secondary cooperatives. US efforts in cooperative development have typically replicated some aspects of the Mondragon model but ignored others.

The Valley Alliance of Worker Co-operatives:Exploring the Potential of Co-op Led Development

Author(s): 
Erbin Crowell
Year: 
2010
[Excerpt] Toward the end of my time with Equal Exchange, I came into contact with members of the co-ops that make up the Valley Alliance of Worker Co-ops (VAWC). I was impressed by the tradition of collective management among these co-ops and the manner in which they had come together to begin developing a network of mutual support in their region. The number and diversity of the enterprises represented in the network was very different from my experience of worker co-ops as isolated enterprises.

Social Development in an Uncertain World: UNRISD Research Agenda 2010–2014

Author(s): 
UNRISD
Year: 
2010
The UNRISD research agenda for 2010–2014 is grounded in a particular understanding of social development, including not only improvements in material well-being but also progress in relation to equity, social cohesion and democratic participation. Over the past decade, UNRISD research has focused on how social policy contributes to development.

Building Resilient Sustainable Economies via the Cooperative Sector and Flexible Specialization: Lessons from the Emilia Romagna Region of Italy

Author(s): 
Joe Rinehart
Year: 
2009
This paper discusses the potential for economic networks to aid in the creation of resilient and sustainable economies, and the social, economic and governmental supports necessary to create those networks. Specifically the cooperative and cooperative networks of the Emilia Romagna region of Italy are examined as well as the system of flexible specialization in production and Industrial Districts that also in exist in that region, along with the support of the La Lega cooperative network, the local culture and regional and national governments.

A Comparative Analysis of Cooperative Sectors in Scotland, Finland, Sweden and Switzerland

Author(s): 
Johnston Birchall
Year: 
2009
Research clearly shows there is considerable scope to generate sustainable economic development by embracing collaborative business models. This is particularly the case in the current climate – where the benefits of co-operation are known to reduce risk, enhance productivity and release wider social, personal and economic benefits. Given the debate about the competitiveness of smaller countries, we wanted to explore the cooperative sectors in three of Europe’s most successful economies – Sweden, Switzerland and Finland – and to consider the implications for Scotland.

The Communist Party in The Land of Cooperation

Author(s): 
Matt Hancock
Year: 
2005
From 1945, until its transformation into the Left wing Democrats in 1989, the Italian Communist Party (PCI) effectively, and uninterruptedly, governed Emilia-Romagna. The Communists in Emilia were master's at building political hegemony. Their leadership style was relatively open and democratic. Local governments under the PCI became known around the world both for their efficiency and efficacy. In addition, the bold and creative economic policies of the PCI have been the object of study throughout the world.

The Cooperative District of Imola: Forging the High Road to Globalization

Author(s): 
Matt Hancock
Year: 
2005
This paper represents a sort of “progress report” with respect to my field research on the cooperative district of Imola. Imola is an extremely unique social and economic “experiment” in democratic, alternative development. Home to some of Italy's oldest cooperatives – and probably the first worker-buyout as well – Imola is literally a town that has cooperation in its DNA.

Local Development in Emilia-Romagna: Alternatives in Action

Author(s): 
Matt Hancock
Year: 
2005
Immediately following World War II, Emilia-Romagna was one of the last regions in Italy in terms of standard of living. Today, Emilia-Romagna is one of the top 20 most prosperous regions in Europe. Emilia- Romagna has the highest per capita income in Italy and the most equitable distribution of wealth: wages are high, and the difference between rich and poor is lower than anywhere else on the peninsula.

The Social and Solidarity Economy: Towards an ‘Alternative’ Globalisation

Author(s): 
Nancy Neamtan
Year: 
2002
The social and solidarity economy are concepts that have become increasingly recognised and used in Quebec since 1995. Following the examples of certain European, as well as Latin American countries, these terms emerged in Quebec as part of a growing will and desire on the part of social movements to propose an alternative model of development, in response to the dominant neo-liberal model. The emergence of this movement has not been without debate, nor obstacles. In fact, the contours and composition of the social economy are still being determined; its definition continues to evolve.

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