United States

Does Cooperation Equal Utopia?

Author(s): 
Anonymous
Year: 
2010
By means of qualitative analysis, this paper examines the organisational cultures underlying three worker cooperatives in the San Francisco Bay Area. 20 workers were interviewed and the transcripts were subsequently analysed along Edgar Schein's cultural framework. The findings show that overall the culture of these worker cooperatives is people-centred: the wellbeing of the workers comes first and the concern for making a profit comes only second.

Subjects of Scale / Spaces of Possibility: Producing Co-operative Space in Theory and Enterprise

Author(s): 
Janelle Terese Cornwell
Year: 
2011
This dissertation addresses key questions raised in Human Geography and Economic Geography concerning scale and the production of space, alternative economic geographies and co-operative economic development. It is the product of a five year ethnographic investigation with cooperative enterprises in Western Massachusetts and the broader Connecticut River Valley of Western New England.

The Valley Alliance of Worker Co-operatives:Exploring the Potential of Co-op Led Development

Author(s): 
Erbin Crowell
Year: 
2010
[Excerpt] Toward the end of my time with Equal Exchange, I came into contact with members of the co-ops that make up the Valley Alliance of Worker Co-ops (VAWC). I was impressed by the tradition of collective management among these co-ops and the manner in which they had come together to begin developing a network of mutual support in their region. The number and diversity of the enterprises represented in the network was very different from my experience of worker co-ops as isolated enterprises.

Beyond the Boss: Building the U.S. Worker Cooperative Movement in the Context of Global Capitalism

Author(s): 
David Ciplet
Year: 
2007
This paper asks the question “What are the key elements to building an effective United States-based worker cooperative movement in the context of global capitalism?” Data was collected by reviewing literature in the field, interviewing 24 worker cooperative movement activists, attending a Network of Bay Area Worker Cooperatives (NoBAWC) meeting, reading posts on the NoBAWC list-serve and talking with worker cooperative movement activists at social and job related events in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Firm Foundations for Democracy? Worker Ownership and Control in Advanced Capitalism

Author(s): 
Sanjay Pinto
Year: 
2013
To what extent do workers exert control within the workplace, and exercise voice in how the income generated by firms is distributed? And do they have ownership—not just in an affective sense, but in terms of share holdings or membership rights? The financial crisis opened up widespread discussion about prevailing modes of economic organization. But, for the most part, this discussion has been quite narrowly bounded, oscillating between two familiar poles. This paper tries to contribute to such a conversation by offering a macro-comparative backdrop.

The Relative Survival of Worker Cooperatives and Barriers to Their Creation

Author(s): 
Erik Olsen
Year: 
2013
This paper argues the conjecture that worker cooperatives (WCs) are rare because of competitive disadvantages relative to conventionally-owned firms (CFs) is not supported by existing research. It surveys research on the survival and failure of WCs and CFs and estimates the nonparametric hazard and survival functions for CFs in the US. Because the rarity of WCs cannot be attributed to performance it must result from a low formation rate.

Co-operatives as spaces of cultural resistance and transformation in alienated consumer society

Author(s): 
Robert Dobrohoczki
Year: 
2013
The co-operative movement has always had uneasy relationship with Marxist philosophy and tradition that concentrated on state ownership. Yet co-operatives are socially owned and operated organizations that operate, theoretically at least, on a non-profit basis, driven by member needs and not capital. For instance, worker co-operatives would not accumulate the “surplus labour” in Marx’s labour theory of value, leaving them immune to accusations of exploitation and worker alienation.

Sectoral Strategies for Low-Income Workers: Lessons from the Field

Author(s): 
Maureen Conway, Amy Blair, Steven L. Dawson, Linda Dworak-Munoz
Year: 
2007
This publication reviews examples of sectoral strategies particularly those that are meeting the needs of low-income workers who face daunting challenges in the labor market. It advances the notion that the dual customer approach to workforce development - one that meets the needs of both the worker and employer - is the optimal approach. It addresses the concept that sound sector strategies can enhance the opportunity for the poor to find employment, retain employment and increase income, and make the nation's businesses more globally competitive.

Jobs and the Urban Poor: Privately Initiated Sectoral Strategies

Author(s): 
Peggy Clark, Steven L. Dawson, Amy J. Kays, Frieda Molina, Rick Surpin
Year: 
1995
This research report looks at the experience of community-based organizations that have undertaken sectoral employment development strategies, and attempts to define these strategies and assess their impact. It's purpose is is to spread the idea that the poor can participate in the competitive economy, to illuminate the practice of using a single industry or occupation to create jobs and economic opportunity for the poor, and to promote the concept that poverty alleviation is linked to economic development.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - United States