United States

Inclusive Capitalism for the American Workforce: Reaping the Rewards of Economic Growth through Broad-based Employee Ownership and Profit Sharing

Author(s): 
Richard Freeman, Joseph Blasi, Douglas Kruse
Year: 
2011
This proposal examines the problem of economic disparity facing the United States, and presents an option for reform based on employee ownership and incentive-based compensation. It also proposes a change in tax policy accordingly and examines the impact of the proposal on a few Fortune 500 firms.

On the Pursuit of Federal Funding for Urban Cooperative Development: A Matter of Fairness in Funding

Author(s): 
Lisa Stolarski
Year: 
2008
This white paper addresses the issue of fairness in funding for cooperative development in the United States and advocates for federally funded cooperative development assistance that is on par with that ofered for non-cooperative business development. It also emphasizes the disparity between rural and urban cooperative access to funding and proposes an increase in availabiity of funding for urban cooperatives without hindering rural cooperative development.

Philadelphia Story

Author(s): 
Whilliam F Whyte
Year: 
1986
Philadelphia is the site of an innovative program, which promises to have profound effects on the future of the employee ownership movement in the United States. The program is led by a union. United Food and Commercial Workers, but that in itself is not unique. Local 46 of the same union was the precedent setter with Rath Packing Company in 1980; United Automobile Workers (UAW) Local 736 followed in 1981; establishing employee ownership for Hyatt-Clark Industries, a former General Motors plant. The pathbreaking features of the Philadelphia program are these:

Equal Exchange: Doing Well by Doing Good

Author(s): 
Benita W. Harris, Frank Shipper, Karen P. Manz, Charles C. Manz
Year: 
2012
EE embarked on its pioneering efforts to sell Fair Trade products in the United States with coffee from Nicaragua. From the beginning, EE paid the producers an above market price for their products out of a desire to help provide a better, more stable income and to more equitably distribute the proceeds of the final sales. The producers are typically small farmers indigenous to their region. On each product the company slogan -- “Small Farmers, Big Change” -- is prominently displayed.

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