International

Worker Owned Cooperatives and the Ecosystems that Support Them

Author(s): 
Rachael Tanner
Year: 
2013
By emphasizing wealth creation, communities can not only cultivate streams of income, but also build wealth. Through collectively owned and democratically governed assets, communities can build wealth. Economic development policy and practice should emphasize wealth creation. Employee ownership, through worker cooperatives is one way to build wealth. But worker cooperatives are rare in the United States; this is because there is not a supportive cooperative ecosystem.

Sustainable Economic Democracy: Worker Cooperatives for the 21st Century

Author(s): 
Nicholas Luviene, Amy Stitely, Lorlene Hoyt
Year: 
2010
This guide explores the worker cooperative network as a neighborhood, municipal and regional strategy for generating wealth. It presents two examples: the well-established Mondragon Complex in Spain and the nascent Evergreen Cooperative Initiative in Cleveland Ohio. Drawing from these two cases the authors then put forth a general framework for building a scalable cooperative network in post-industrial American cities.

Social Development in an Uncertain World: UNRISD Research Agenda 2010–2014

Author(s): 
UNRISD
Year: 
2010
The UNRISD research agenda for 2010–2014 is grounded in a particular understanding of social development, including not only improvements in material well-being but also progress in relation to equity, social cohesion and democratic participation. Over the past decade, UNRISD research has focused on how social policy contributes to development.

Building Resilient Sustainable Economies via the Cooperative Sector and Flexible Specialization: Lessons from the Emilia Romagna Region of Italy

Author(s): 
Joe Rinehart
Year: 
2009
This paper discusses the potential for economic networks to aid in the creation of resilient and sustainable economies, and the social, economic and governmental supports necessary to create those networks. Specifically the cooperative and cooperative networks of the Emilia Romagna region of Italy are examined as well as the system of flexible specialization in production and Industrial Districts that also in exist in that region, along with the support of the La Lega cooperative network, the local culture and regional and national governments.

A Comparative Analysis of Cooperative Sectors in Scotland, Finland, Sweden and Switzerland

Author(s): 
Johnston Birchall
Year: 
2009
Research clearly shows there is considerable scope to generate sustainable economic development by embracing collaborative business models. This is particularly the case in the current climate – where the benefits of co-operation are known to reduce risk, enhance productivity and release wider social, personal and economic benefits. Given the debate about the competitiveness of smaller countries, we wanted to explore the cooperative sectors in three of Europe’s most successful economies – Sweden, Switzerland and Finland – and to consider the implications for Scotland.

The Communist Party in The Land of Cooperation

Author(s): 
Matt Hancock
Year: 
2005
From 1945, until its transformation into the Left wing Democrats in 1989, the Italian Communist Party (PCI) effectively, and uninterruptedly, governed Emilia-Romagna. The Communists in Emilia were master's at building political hegemony. Their leadership style was relatively open and democratic. Local governments under the PCI became known around the world both for their efficiency and efficacy. In addition, the bold and creative economic policies of the PCI have been the object of study throughout the world.

The Cooperative District of Imola: Forging the High Road to Globalization

Author(s): 
Matt Hancock
Year: 
2005
This paper represents a sort of “progress report” with respect to my field research on the cooperative district of Imola. Imola is an extremely unique social and economic “experiment” in democratic, alternative development. Home to some of Italy's oldest cooperatives – and probably the first worker-buyout as well – Imola is literally a town that has cooperation in its DNA.

Local Development in Emilia-Romagna: Alternatives in Action

Author(s): 
Matt Hancock
Year: 
2005
Immediately following World War II, Emilia-Romagna was one of the last regions in Italy in terms of standard of living. Today, Emilia-Romagna is one of the top 20 most prosperous regions in Europe. Emilia- Romagna has the highest per capita income in Italy and the most equitable distribution of wealth: wages are high, and the difference between rich and poor is lower than anywhere else on the peninsula.

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