For Existing Worker Cooperatives

Information coming soon

Browse the Resource Library or Service Provider directory for support

Resources for Existing Worker Coops

Employee-Ownership Briefing Paper 1.3

Author(s): 
Ownership Associates, Inc.
Year: 
2003
In the 28 years since Congress established Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs), over 10,000 U.S. companies have adopted and maintained ESOPs—dozens of studies have evaluated the effects of ESOP on company performance. After reviewing the research literature, Dr. Douglas Kruse concluded: “25 years of research shows that employee ownership often leads to higher-performing workplaces and better compensation and work lives for employees.” Study 1 (below) indicates that this “ownership effect” averages 2 to 3% per year on a variety of measures.

Employee-Ownership Briefing Paper 7.2

Author(s): 
Ownership Associates, Inc.
Year: 
2003
One key rationale for the creation of ESOP law in 1974 was to share wealth with the workers who helped create wealth. Today, many companies use the wealth sharing aspect of their ESOPs as an effective retention and recruitment tool. But just how effective a means of distributing wealth are ESOPs? Two studies, one conducted in Washington State and one in Massachusetts, have looked at the wealth consequences of ESOPs.

Indivisible Reserves: unallocated equity as a way co-ops can help fortify their future

Author(s): 
Bruce Reynolds
Year: 
2013
One practice in particular deserves more attention in the United States cooperative community: the use of indivisible reserves (IR). The International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) specifies IR as a component of its 3rd cooperative principle: “member economic participation.” This co-op principle addresses several financial policies, including allocation of surpluses or residual earnings. A few alternative uses of surpluses are recommended, such as distribution of member dividends and “….setting up reserves, part of which, at least, would be indivisible” (ICA).

Enabling Policy Environments for Cooperative Development: A Comparative Experience

Author(s): 
Monica Juarez Adeler
Year: 
2013
This research report identifies policies, structures, and financing mechanisms that can inform the development of appropriate models for Manitoba as well as suppot sector-controlled and self-sustaining co-operative development organizations. In so doing the report analyzes the context and history, sector infrastructure, tax legislation, and policies impacting cooperative development in Spain (Mondragon Co-op), Italy (the Emilia Romagna region), Quebec, and Manitoba.